What is Nestology?

We believe our patrons deserve furniture built to last, with style that always looks unique and fresh.  Every piece in our collection is selected by our designer, Paul Miller, twice recognized by Washington-area Home and Design magazine for superior design vision. Beautiful, functional, and sustainable upholstery should compliment your home for years.   

We know that Nestology upholstery makes any room better.

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A Look Back on 2016

"The use of a rich plum on the walls serves up a warm and cool helping of wow factor" - PM 

"The use of a rich plum on the walls serves up a warm and cool helping of wow factor" - PM 

A client's gathering room in their historic home in Winchester VA. We furnished this space with a combination of American made and vintage goods. Built-ins provide a clean space to showcase our client's collection of art and artifacts. We visually merchandised the collection so that each vignette is a punctuation of beauty making up the canvas of the entire wall display.

Moody and sultry, Benjamin Moore's Vintage Claret comes to life in the lamp-lit corners of the room. We chose the palette to compliment our client's collection of Asian art.

We sourced the furnishings from our favorite North Carolina makers. Just out of the frame, the client's own lamp and artifact perch on a vintage Brandt octagon table we picked up in western Maryland - not far from its original manufacture location. 

"This cheerful floral felt well suited to all seasons in this sunny oasis." - PM

"This cheerful floral felt well suited to all seasons in this sunny oasis." - PM

In this happy gathering room on a creek side property, one can experience the joys of each season through large wood framed windows. A pair of American made swivel rockers from our maker out of High Point, North Carolina wear a vibrant, meandering (and sun-safe!) print.

On the American made sectional and ottoman, we selected our fabrics for a posh pairing of hardworking velvet and a colorful woven. We made our overall choices light, bright, and colorful for this room, bringing out stunning contrast in the architecture of the space.

As a whole, the room has the play of masculine and feminine, light and dark, textured and smooth, effectively balancing the design.

"A massive custom shadow box was key to transforming the dense collection of small treasures into a single graphic monolith. " -PM

Welcome to Ed's Heads Hair Salon on historic Main Street in Stephens City. The dapper collector's look was largely inspired by the owner of the salon. Perfection is found when the large comercial-friendly Spicher Co. vinyl rug, American made sofa, and a pair of fabulous vintage redux chairs make friends.

We played boldly with pattern at Ed's Heads. The vinyl rug is custom made to order in Pennsylvania and we paired it with a Californian sofa frame upholstered in a soft plaid flannel to make the lively combination.

We got our hands dirty making this custom shadow box for the waiting area. A classic green off sets the glazed walnut stain for a been-there-forever look that is perfect for the salon's quirky collections. Just out of view, are spectacular felted light fixtures dotting the high ceilings over the workstations. 

Hospitality accents like flowers and mementos add personal flair to this locally owned salon.

We chose joyful and expressive fabrics to keep this classic design upbeat.

A traditional project in Lake Frederic called for fresh fabric choices, highlighting the rich wooden pieces in the space. Crisp contrast welting in a dark teal outlines these custom made cushions. A perfect pair for cozy reading in the sunniest room of our client's home.

The transitional frames of the artisan made sofas in this room wear a practical upholstery that will be loved for years to come. Bright custom pillows and warm brass and wood tones provide an ambiance of coziness to the space. Mirrored tray tables work double duty to reflect light in the space, and to hold our client's treasures. 

"The serene turquoise grasscloth brought out the warm tones in the mid-century dining set. Suddenly everything clicked." -PM

"The serene turquoise grasscloth brought out the warm tones in the mid-century dining set. Suddenly everything clicked." -PM

For this project, we took design inspiration from our client's heirloom mid-century dining set. From color palette to accessories and material choices, we love how this space came together around a treasured piece. We used a combination of our client's keepsakes and accessories from our sources to round out the design.

In the same home, the breakfast room carries on the mid-century thread with a vintage hutch. We painted the find in a Benjamin Moore color to freshen the look. 

A sunshine colored Company C wool rug anchors the room and provides a point of dramatic lightness on the dark floors.

Here's to many more delightful projects in 2017!

Five Designer Favorites Vol.1

Hello, Nesters!

There has been a lot to inspire me this year - from finding new innovative makers to rediscovering classics that had fallen off my radar.  Not too long ago I would have been steeped in roughened woods with a grayish wash.  Today we have rediscovered the quiet elegance of walnut and cherry woods. After many long seasons of linens that pretended to be burlap, we see the uprising of lux velvets and graphic prints.  Even rusty finishes are ceding the way for a tsunami of molten gold faucets and fixtures.  Design is always changing, always expressive of something about the moment.  Perhaps our economy picking up has whetted appetites for things that lean toward the refined.  Here are just a few of my current delights.   

Sap Cherry Wood

I find the lighter sapwood from the outer portions of the cherry tree so engaging.  When selected artfully, the result is a striking hi-low pattern that adds immeasurably to the impact of understated furniture like our Heartland Table. For many years Queen Anne-inspired furniture cloaked the warm and deep grain of cherry in dark stains that essentially masked the wood's characteristic cathedrals.  Makers now are drawing influences from Arts and Crafts and especially from Mid-Century design, so the grain is left visible by the use of light clear finishes.  This is the way sap cherry is meant to be dressed.

Photo: MakeNest

Photo: MakeNest

Graphic Pillows

Our collection of pillows from Arnge embody everything there is to love about mid-century design.  The bold retro graphics make me want to binge watch The Dick Van Dyke Show for hours, while the kaleidoscope of colors are a study in harmony with just a skosh of friction.  Having been schooled in the finer points of sewing, I was pleased to see that the patterns match from front to back so that the design moves fluidly around the pillow.  Each one is made to order in the USA without the use of sweatshop labor, which is another reason to tip our hats to this maker.

Wool & Silk Carpets

When I was apprenticing in design back at the turn of the last century, my mentor was a dealer in fine hand-made carpets.  Helping to show her selections to her clients was an education. Peeling back dozens of beautiful carpets was good exercise, but it was also like peering into the pages of a journal from an ancient people.  Combining forms from nature and architecture, the patterns and colors - as well as the art of weaving itself - are part of a cherished tradition.  While wool is still the most common material in a hand-knotted carpets, the addition of silk adds highlights that outline the design and glimmer magically.  

Vinyl Rugs

I discovered the designs of Spicher & Co. a couple of years ago and am still finding new uses for these fabulous designs.  Not surprisingly, these graphics are created by artist designers and not fabricated from a short list of popular motifs.  Drawing inspiration from vintage linoleum rugs that were popular well into the first half of the 20th century, there is something about these rugs that feels simultaneously fresh and nostalgic.  I like using them because they add a strong graphic to a room and because they can exist in spaces where sometimes other rugs aren't ideal.  And these are printed in house in Pennsylvania, so we feel like they come to us from just over the mountain, as they say.

Deco Influences

When I first spotted this chair at market, I knew I wanted to put a whimsical and magical fabric on the frame.  With its graceful arms and deeply scooped back profile, I was reminded of chairs from my favorite 1930s black and white films.  This piece would have existed in a screwball comedy - in the country house of the haughty old aunt who wears a lorgnette, winds up getting a little tipsy on dandelion wine, and eventually comes around to like the mustachioed anti-hero her wide-eyed niece wants to marry.  Her house would have gilded things but also ruffles. For me those Hollywood sets are an escape into unabashed style.  So we outfitted this chair in a colorful Asian toile, trimmed her skirt in velvet, and the rest is history.

Thanks for indulging me on a journey through some of the things that have been in my look book and on my mind this season.

Cheers!

PM

Surreal Journey

One of our many short summer trips took us to the gorgeously curated Hi-Fructose art exhibit at MOCA in Virginia Beach. Each artist tells a different story - from nightmare scape to upside down fairy tale - with refinement and stunning potency.  This art merges our ideas of the sweetly precious with the murkier matters of the human inner world. Here are a few among many at the exhibit that roused our curiosity and fed our visual appetite.  

Mark Ryden,  Rosie's Tea Party  

Mark Ryden, Rosie's Tea Party 

Mark Dean Veca,  Madder Hatter

Mark Dean Veca, Madder Hatter

Tim Biskup,  Asylum #1  

Tim Biskup, Asylum #1 

Kris Kuksi,  Eros at Play  

Kris Kuksi, Eros at Play 

Martin Wittfooth,  Incantation  

Martin Wittfooth, Incantation 

Timeless Choices

As we prepare for our Fall upholstery launch, dozens of fabric swatches are passing through our hands, swimming in our heads, and making their way into the latest offerings at the boutique. A few stalwart heroes have survived from the previous season - a testament to picking classics over fads - but we're excited to share our predictions for the next chapter in textiles.

Lux Velvets

While buttery poly-velvets have been a practical family room fabric for a few seasons, we're watching an influx of classic cotton velvets return to the mix.  These beautiful fabrics have a denser weave and a warmer hand.  And cotton receives dye better than polyester, yielding richer colors - a boon at a time when jewel tones are poised for a comeback. 

Woven Geometrics

Unlike their printed cousins, these woven patterns employ the loom to produce their dynamic look.  While we are huge fans of printed fabrics -  see our summer print blog -  we think this variety produces a more refined character.  Depending on the thread content, the durability may also be better than print on lighter weight goods, making these great bets for high-traffic upholstery.  

Haberdasher Texture

The worst excesses of Herculon fabric in the 80s and 90s sent designers fleeing for the supple simplicity of micro-suede earlier this century, but we find that coarse wovens are enjoying a timely comeback.  The light and shadow on the surface of a toothy fabric helps disguise normal wear and tear, an advantage in high traffic areas. Mid-century design continues to gain appeal and a hallmark of the era was textural solids, fueled in part by innovations in raw materials that were developed during WWII and throughout the Space Age.