What is Nestology?

We believe our patrons deserve furniture built to last, with style that always looks unique and fresh.  Every piece in our collection is selected by our designer, Paul Miller, twice recognized by Washington-area Home and Design magazine for superior design vision. Beautiful, functional, and sustainable upholstery should compliment your home for years.   

We know that Nestology upholstery makes any room better.

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A Designer Guide to Buying Upholstery

Upholstery is the most hard working furniture in the home, providing enduring comfort and establishing the personality of the room through its stylings and fabric. No one wants to regret this choice either on delivery day because the fabric doesn't compliment the room or a couple of years down the line because the sofa hasn't held up to wear and tear. 

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Why Brick and Mortar Matters

Visit our studio to have a conversation with our sales experts, choose from our fabric and wood samples, and feel the superior construction of pieces made by artisans across the United States. Find your heirloom here - buy local, support artisans, go green.

Our passion for quality and sustainable living really comes to life in our studio as we listen to the wants and needs of our patrons and guide them to the products that best suit them. We take a hands on and empathetic approach to sales - something that can't be executed online. 

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While competitors both online and regionally want to sell you something right now, here we want to help you select the right thing for a life time. That means we do the research and legwork to present only the best. Direct relationships with makers ensure quality. American artisans guarantee a small carbon footprint and sustainable resourcing. MakeNest staff promises an exceptional fit for the functionality and aesthetic of your home. 

What is gained in this model is an element of longevity for the consumer that is more valuable than the 'fast fashion' options available en masse through cold online retailers. Here in the sanctuary behind the bricks, construction and style are upheld in products that last a lifetime.  

The Crawford collection is offered in chair, loveseat, and sofa frames.  See more of this collection>

The Crawford collection is offered in chair, loveseat, and sofa frames. See more of this collection>

The Axis collection dining table.  See more of this collection>

The Axis collection dining table. See more of this collection>

Timeless Choices

As we prepare for our Fall upholstery launch, dozens of fabric swatches are passing through our hands, swimming in our heads, and making their way into the latest offerings at the boutique. A few stalwart heroes have survived from the previous season - a testament to picking classics over fads - but we're excited to share our predictions for the next chapter in textiles.

Lux Velvets

While buttery poly-velvets have been a practical family room fabric for a few seasons, we're watching an influx of classic cotton velvets return to the mix.  These beautiful fabrics have a denser weave and a warmer hand.  And cotton receives dye better than polyester, yielding richer colors - a boon at a time when jewel tones are poised for a comeback. 

Woven Geometrics

Unlike their printed cousins, these woven patterns employ the loom to produce their dynamic look.  While we are huge fans of printed fabrics -  see our summer print blog -  we think this variety produces a more refined character.  Depending on the thread content, the durability may also be better than print on lighter weight goods, making these great bets for high-traffic upholstery.  

Haberdasher Texture

The worst excesses of Herculon fabric in the 80s and 90s sent designers fleeing for the supple simplicity of micro-suede earlier this century, but we find that coarse wovens are enjoying a timely comeback.  The light and shadow on the surface of a toothy fabric helps disguise normal wear and tear, an advantage in high traffic areas. Mid-century design continues to gain appeal and a hallmark of the era was textural solids, fueled in part by innovations in raw materials that were developed during WWII and throughout the Space Age.    

Sustainability

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Some companies have practiced responsible forestry for years, harvesting and replanting in turn to provide resources for future production, but now there are more offerings made of salvaged wood.  This practice not only cuts down on waste that burdens landfills but it also lessens deforestation.  Old wood has characteristics difficult to reproduce in virgin wood, such as raised grain and general weathering, so for those who love a lot of texture and a sense of age in their pieces, the benefits are obvious.  Knowing you tread a little lighter on the planet feels nice, too.

One furniture designer I met with at market some years past opts to produce her line of rubberwood, a trend out of Asia. Rubber trees too mature for latex production used to be thrown on burn piles.  To my understanding, an English furniture manufacturer a few decades ago began to experiment with this 'waste wood' and discovered that it was not only useful in furniture making, but took both painted and stained finishes beautifully.  This extremely heavy species has a dense, attractive grain, and, once properly kiln-dried, is very consistent, meaning that splitting and warping are not an issue.  The furnishings my new acquaintance designs and manufactures are not only stylish and durable, they follow this direction of taking some responsibility for our planetary health by reducing the rate of deforestation.

-PM